Dying woman saved by ‘pig kidney transplant’

Last-ditch attempt to save woman who suffered from abscess sizeed ‘pig kidney’ from a pig rejected kidney was not chosen for funding Dying woman with incurable disease to get ‘pig kidney transplant’ Read more…

Dying woman saved by 'pig kidney transplant'

Last-ditch attempt to save woman who suffered from abscess sizeed ‘pig kidney’ from a pig rejected kidney was not chosen for funding

Dying woman with incurable disease to get ‘pig kidney transplant’ Read more

After failing to raise enough money to save a 65-year-old woman from an incurable disease, an anonymous donor has offered to donate a pig kidney to keep her alive.

The stricken woman, who has yet to be named, is suffering from Cox’s sarcoma, a rare form of cancer which will lead to her dying of renal failure in the coming weeks. Despite receiving chemotherapy, it still has not cleared.

The pig transplant, which was attempted last year as a last-ditch attempt to save the woman, was not chosen for funding.

However, after a specially-trained team trained at a special animal hospital was put into action and determined that the animal, a Holstein Friesian pig, could survive a number of examinations to ensure it was healthy, and avoid infection, a transplant was successfully carried out.

The organ was offered by a deceased donor who had been living next door to the woman since the attack.

The patient was taken to hospital in Wakefield in northern England, where surgeons, nursing staff and anaesthetists worked together for 10 hours to carry out the life-saving operation.

Speaking at the British Kidney Fund’s annual conference in Sheffield, Friends of the British Kidney Charity chief executive David White said she was able to recover well from the surgery after surgery and the assistance from her neighbours, who provided food and other necessities during the day, was invaluable.

“The operation went well and the patient recovered well,” he said. “She was soon feeding and going to the toilet on her own.

“The operation and the amount of support her neighbours provided were really a credit to everybody involved and they should be very proud.”

Last year the British Heart Foundation became the first charity in Britain to raise the sum of £1m to help fund an animal transplant. The money was used to pay for the research necessary to allow liver and kidney transplants from non-human primates, and the operation was carried out in March.

In April, it was reported that a 57-year-old man from Manchester had won a kidney transplant through the lottery – and as a thank you, was given one of the donors’ teeth as a gift.

Michael Armfield was so close to death that his family were convinced that a kidney he was receiving from a friend was the wrong one. But the operation went well, and he was so fortunate that he was given the donor’s tooth as a gift.

“At that time a friend donated the kidney and it went pretty well so I was quite thrilled,” he said. “He was given a tooth by his wife which I’ve been given in my wallet as a gift.”

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