‘Great Beach’ in Australia feels like the Dead Sea

Written by Staff Writer There’s a beach to explore, a public holiday and awesome views from a remote shore — so why is no one there? That’s the thinking behind the Australian art installation…

'Great Beach' in Australia feels like the Dead Sea

Written by Staff Writer

There’s a beach to explore, a public holiday and awesome views from a remote shore — so why is no one there?

That’s the thinking behind the Australian art installation “The Dead Sea, Great Beach”

On display until July 15, the sea in Palm Cove, Tasmania, is mirrored in the small Australian city’s outbuilding.

A large-scale nude photograph, created by Belgian artist Linda Chin, is rising from the sand — a gallery wall positioned overhead.

Palm Cove welcomes thousands of tourists to the waterside every year but not on a daily basis like the ones in nearby Nelsons Bay.

The region depends on the Dead Sea.

According to the Australian NPT Research Institute , the Dead Sea area is home to the animals and plants in the Dead Sea, which contribute to Australia’s largest biosecurity zone.

However, a sharp rise in phosphate mining and Israel’s deepening of a massive and dangerous port project in the area have done little to benefit the locals.

“We were expecting as many people to come to Nelsons Bay on our holiday time as they would normally do in December, February and March,” said Tamsin Thomas, information officer for the Victorian region of the parks.

“One of the reasons for putting it up is that many tourists leave without noticing it, if it’s all there in one place.

“It is a very visual way of telling the story — it would probably be harder for someone not to notice if you put up a sign about the Dead Sea.”

After a walk through the caves, crossing the shallow Coptic potholes, and arriving at the spot where the sand mirrored the Dead Sea, visitors discover the stunning ‘galleria,’ a temporary space complete with ancient temples.

The ‘galleria’ is filled with art and natural sculptures.

Check out the scale model of the Dead Sea.

“What I love about the exhibit is the extreme effect on the environment,” said Barry Morgan, curator of the exhibition.

“Most people are aware that the Dead Sea is shrinking but it’s only now really starting to register as an issue for people.”

The NPT Institute and partner Orange Coast College have dedicated 3.5 years of research to document the changes to the local ecological community, including the rise in phosphate mining and the damaged tunnels of the Diddig Dam.

The exhibit was inspired by the Israeli D-4 port project (Deharim De’Dondor).

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