‘Hamlet’ in the skies? The story behind Taiwan’s newest airline

This article is over 4 months old Winglight Airlines, Taiwan’s first civilian aircraft carrier, turns two and is mulling another route ‘Hamlet’ in the skies? The story behind Taiwan’s newest airline A new airline’s…

‘Hamlet’ in the skies? The story behind Taiwan’s newest airline

This article is over 4 months old

Winglight Airlines, Taiwan’s first civilian aircraft carrier, turns two and is mulling another route

‘Hamlet’ in the skies? The story behind Taiwan’s newest airline

A new airline’s model is a Play: Hamlet and stars James Mingus-Keith in the role of the cunning prince, in flight for Winglight Airlines.

Except the movie is about real life aviation experts flying a plane that is half wings that fold up into portable hangars.

It was created by Tetsuya Wang and Kunihiko Miyazaki, in a little more than a year.

“It’s such a rare feat for an aircraft carrier of aircraft carriers to fly and carry passengers. So we thought it would be cool,” Wang said.

“Everyone thought that this was a crazy idea. But we thought: ‘We can do it!’”

Winglight took off on 4 March 2016 and recently received 10 orders. They plan to launch the airline from the North Sea, and plan to fly two routes, one from Taipei to the North Atlantic, and another to the Caribbean.

“The case of ‘Hamlet’, he made his own wings and he builds an airplane and flies it to save Claudius,” the pilot Moy Lin told Reuters.

A show at a theatre in Tokyo. Photograph: Yuri Gripas/Reuters

The stunt has already been copied in Japan and Taiwan and is trending on social media.

The scale of the aviation feat takes special skill, Lang said. “This shows we have a very unique secret talent. We have a trick, but there are other people who also have tricks in their secret programme.”

The airline expects to deliver its first jetliner by the end of the year.

Winglight Airlines planes weigh 800 tonnes but are can travel up to 500km at an altitude of 7,000 metres (21,000ft).

In the middle of an arts festival, the new airline had its Japanese open house on the street frontage of the landmark Toho Theatre in Tokyo.

The “C” feature of Winglight’s logo was inspired by the colour of a piece of theatre performance that contains “many sort of C’s”, Wang said.

“Our slogan is: ‘Just what you need: all the time’.”

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