I couldn’t focus, so my mom pushed me to become a chess player: 11-year-old with ADHD

When Tani Adewumi was just 6 years old, he was diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). But he’s shown no signs of self-medicating or obsessing over his failure. The 11-year-old has shown impressive…

I couldn’t focus, so my mom pushed me to become a chess player: 11-year-old with ADHD

When Tani Adewumi was just 6 years old, he was diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). But he’s shown no signs of self-medicating or obsessing over his failure. The 11-year-old has shown impressive potential as a chess player and has qualified for the US Open tournament in Iowa next month. He recently joined the staff of The Grio, while sharing his story of how chess has not only helped him become successful, but for his family too.

Adewumi’s mother — who would lose her job as a dental assistant when Tani was in first grade and now works for a community college — found solace and comfort in chess. She explained that she came up with the “Silk Street Twins” system for helping her son — a combination of puzzles and rote behavior techniques.

“Tani got used to solving puzzles because when he struggled with one he would distract himself by working on the others and it got better,” Adewumi’s mother said.

Although she appreciates the chess program, Adewumi sometimes struggles to keep up with the pressures of high school, and loves playing chess.

“The chess match was so exciting and watching chess gets me excited,” Adewumi told The Grio. “When I play I like to have fun and try new things to see how I can outplay the opponent and win the game.”

Read the full story at The Grio.

Related

Ruth Bader Ginsburg to return to court on Monday for now, but eight clerks are absent

Brazilian transgender teen praises ‘transgender family’ that invited her to live with them

Indigenous women are most at risk of contracting the deadly Zika virus in Borneo

Leave a Comment