Italy sees wave of Nazi graffiti following Nazi ‘plot’

Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Vandals have attacked dozens of buildings near the Italian capital Dozens of public buildings in central Italy have been daubed with swastikas and fascist symbols during the past…

Italy sees wave of Nazi graffiti following Nazi 'plot'

Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Vandals have attacked dozens of buildings near the Italian capital

Dozens of public buildings in central Italy have been daubed with swastikas and fascist symbols during the past month.

The vandalism appeared overnight in Naples, the Fascist stronghold of the 1930s.

The latest wave of attacks has drawn condemnation from the right and from the left.

Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte’s response was the reverse of his predecessor’s – responding angrily to similar reports of anti-Semitic graffiti in 2018.

The government has denounced the graffiti as “repugnant” and promised to intensify a campaign against xenophobia.

In the Naples area, construction sites were targeted, and buildings vandalised with swastikas and star-of-David symbols.

In Carpi – not far from Naples – graffiti appeared, showing fascist leader Benito Mussolini, along with threatening phrases.

Fascist symbols were also daubed on a statue of Genghis Khan in the same region.

Vandals have also set fire to dozens of buildings near the Italian capital, Rome.

The anti-fascist European Movement in Italy (EMIL) said it was “stupefied” by the vandalism, branding it a “new provocation against fascism”.

On Thursday, Prime Minister Conte called for urgent action and set up a task force to combat xenophobia and antisemitism.

Actions should be undertaken at the local level, he added, and the “systemic political and criminal corruption” that has allowed xenophobia to flourish must be tackled.

When reports of anti-Jewish graffiti emerged in the past, but much louder condemnation came from the centre-left Italian Democratic Party.

Watch: Protests after Jewish writer stabbed in Italy

Italy’s often-considered to be a tolerant society had been shocked by the 2014 killing of two young Muslims near the northern city of Turin – allegedly by far-right extremists.

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