‘Oh No, Not You Again’: Arranged marriage between Baldwin and young woman ends in tragic way

LOS ANGELES — Friends and family gathered for a vigil Sunday at Cathedral Basilica of Our Lady of the Angels to remember Halyna Hutchins, a high school friend of Alec Baldwin who was shot…

‘Oh No, Not You Again’: Arranged marriage between Baldwin and young woman ends in tragic way

LOS ANGELES — Friends and family gathered for a vigil Sunday at Cathedral Basilica of Our Lady of the Angels to remember Halyna Hutchins, a high school friend of Alec Baldwin who was shot and killed Sunday by police after she opened fire in his Hollywood Hills home.

Police confirmed they were investigating the death of Hutchins, 27, of Granada Hills, who was wounded in the arm and has been hospitalized at the UCLA Medical Center in Westwood.

Police said one officer was treated for a panic attack after the shooting and the other suffered minor injuries. Police have not released the officers’ names.

A spokesman for a group called Justice4Halyna told The Washington Post that the group plans to file a lawsuit soon against Los Angeles Police Department. The group claims Hutchins and Baldwin had been in a tumultuous relationship.

“It’s tragic that Halyna has been taken out of this world, but it is the result of her bitter attempt to pursue Alec,” the spokesman, Tom Nayak, said.

Los Angeles police Lt. Andy Neiman declined to discuss the status of the investigation or potential causes of death.

“It’s the LAPD’s investigation and that of the City Attorney,” Neiman said. “That’s what it will take.”

Nayak said that Hutchins also worked at Village Voice Media, the company that owns a variety of lifestyle websites, including Vagabond Lady, where she was a writer. She would often share images on the site about her political activism, he said.

Hutchins was a 2009 graduate of Los Angeles High School who went on to Mount Holyoke College, a women’s liberal arts college in South Hadley, Massachusetts, where she was a member of the honors student advisory board.

Her plans for a career as a writer included a dream to work for a Hillary Clinton campaign, her Facebook page showed.

A vigil in her honor was held in Los Angeles on Saturday night, Nayak said.

Hutchins started her writing career at Village Voice Media in 2014, when she started a personal essay series called “Oh No, Not You Again” about those overcoming adversity, her Facebook page showed.

“I hope that people see this as a sad loss, not her literary contributions,” Nayak said. “This is someone who took a lot of risks.”

One of her last posts on Facebook was a screen shot of The Atlantic magazine’s online story featuring the cover line, “Pivot Left: Exposing the Madness.”

Hutchins was the young “warrior girl” who marches in the streets with her braids, and she loves to protest against gender inequality, said Patrice Freeman, 44, a friend who founded the Walk for Change Foundation, which creates annual events around feminism.

Hutchins’ mother, who works for the city of Los Angeles, attended the memorial and cried throughout.

“This has left us in a state of disbelief,” Freeman said. “She was a creative force.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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