Royal Caribbean’s Majesty of the Seas will be sailing from Sydney to South America for nine months

Royal Caribbean’s Majesty of the Seas is set to embark on a nine-month world cruise, moving from Sydney through Peru, Ecuador, Argentina, Panama, San Salvador, Cuba, Mexico, and the Dominican Republic before returning to…

Royal Caribbean’s Majesty of the Seas will be sailing from Sydney to South America for nine months

Royal Caribbean’s Majesty of the Seas is set to embark on a nine-month world cruise, moving from Sydney through Peru, Ecuador, Argentina, Panama, San Salvador, Cuba, Mexico, and the Dominican Republic before returning to the waters of Australia in late November.

The voyage—which will set sail in October—will travel to five ports in South America. Starting in Lima, the ship will stop in Manzanillo and Puerto Coronado in the southwestern portion of the continent, spending several days at sea on the Pacific and Panama Canals, and passing through Lake Titicaca en route to the Guayaquil area.

Travelers will then head to the key sites in Ecuador, including Quito, Cartagena, Manoscari, Manapol, and British Virgin Islands. Onboard activities will focus on sustainability, including cruise workshops on Costa Rica’s rainforest and Panama Canal history. The ship will then make its way to Córdoba, El Alto, and Punta del Este in Ecuador.

The ship then returns to the Andean port of Cádiz in southern Spain, where it will spend its final two weeks, retracing its travels from the beginning of the cruise in Sydney, South Australia.

“Australians are amongst the most adventurous travelers in the world, and seeing all the amazing destinations we visit is something we’re looking forward to,” said Guy Richards, director of Royal Caribbean Australia.

“MUST SEA” is expected to spend 10 months sailing around the world with several North American port calls, before returning to Sydney. With summer beach travel on a high, these itineraries are sure to be highly sought after.

For more information, visit Royal Caribbean.

This article first appeared on Chalkboard.

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