‘Ruby Sparks’ prop maker says the ‘cold gun’ on Michael Cera’s character was ‘totally scary’

The movie prop maker who according to The Hollywood Reporter said he received threatening text messages and email messages and had worked on two other flicks that ended up in mishaps because of unsafe…

'Ruby Sparks' prop maker says the 'cold gun' on Michael Cera's character was 'totally scary'

The movie prop maker who according to The Hollywood Reporter said he received threatening text messages and email messages and had worked on two other flicks that ended up in mishaps because of unsafe set conditions says he considered the person who allegedly used the “cold gun” on Michael Cera’s character “a menace.”

Dau Stevens, whose company lit the screen for the movie “Ruby Sparks,” recently shared his account of the confrontation with Stevens and a New York Observer writer at the Television Critics Association event in Pasadena, Calif. last month.

“You let me down,” Stevens told Joel Edgerton, the actor who plays Caliban in “The Catechism Cataclysm.” “You’re no longer working with me.”

Edgerton also allegedly reached for the “cold gun” used on screen.

Stevens insists he never reached for the weapon. But, he said, the “cold gun” Stevens used isn’t one he carries. And the prop is seen on screen, holding a kitchen knife, when Caliban’s character threatens to slit the throats of parents celebrating a birthday at a house in the movie.

Stevens described the scene as being “inappropriate.”

“The way it was acted, it was unrealistic and very disturbing,” Stevens said. “The setup in the kitchen with all those kids, he looked like he was going to go after a kid.”

Cera reacted to the confrontation with the Brooklyn-based Stevens by saying, “I’m just shocked that it’s like this — like, shocking that somebody could make an uproar over something like that.”

Stevens responded that he was shocked. “That’s what’s so crazy about it. You’re asking me how I feel and I have no idea,” he said.

At one point during the meeting, Stevens suggested taking the movie to the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department for review.

As the meeting progressed, however, Stevens said that members of the crew “started to step forward.” Steven shared screen shots with his colleagues of bizarre messages sent to him and his company.

One, he said, was written by a person who claimed to be an accountant and who texted, “I know exactly what would happen if they call law enforcement on you, cold guns like that can kill someone in the blink of an eye.”

After the meeting, Stevens said he turned the communication over to a security guard at the meeting to show the film. The message sender was not identified, though the person ultimately sent the backup “the weapon” photograph.

The new film — which also stars Edgerton, Kate Mara and Michael Cera — centers on an idealistic priest forced to save the life of his teenage nephew after discovering the boy has become the antichrist.

Stevens said “sadistically funny” film choices he and his crew made on the project contributed to the situation. “Yes, the gun was used in the scene,” he said. “Yes, the prop department destroyed the kitchen knife used in the scene. Yes, the prop department replaced the bar in the bedroom with a decorative platform.”

Stevens also alleged the director allowed actors and a “child actor” to push furniture around at a crucial moment.

But the “gun” Stevens actually used, he said, was nothing special. “It was a point and click that lights and splashes the blood on the floor,” he said.

Stevens added that “someone” used the “cold gun” on him in the past, and he did not use it on his companies.

“I like to think it wasn’t the ‘cold gun.’ But someone made it angry and almost had me hit my head on the counter,” he said.

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