Should You Get the HPV-19 Vaccine?

The CDC just announced a new vaccine, called Cervareline-19, has been approved to prevent complications of cutaneous (smiley) herpes from occurring in children and teenagers. This should be a big deal for those of…

Should You Get the HPV-19 Vaccine?

The CDC just announced a new vaccine, called Cervareline-19, has been approved to prevent complications of cutaneous (smiley) herpes from occurring in children and teenagers. This should be a big deal for those of us with an HV/STI like genital herpes, but should it be a big deal for us? Not necessarily. Let’s take a closer look at some of the risks associated with this vaccine and why this type of immunization is recommended.

Who is at risk for genital herpes?

Overall, most people who develop genital herpes are adults and have been exposed to the virus during their life, starting from age 15. However, it is currently estimated that more than 50% of all sexually active people carry herpes, and those with this infection have been known to engage in unprotected sex and/or serial promiscuity.

Gonorrhea can easily be transmitted from one person to another and also has many types of bacteria that make it as a highly contagious disease. If you do have sex, it is very important to make sure to make sure you are using a condom, having safe sex with other people, or using safer sex practices for preventing the transmission of an STI like gonorrhea. Gonorrhea is much more of a serious disease than herpes, and once it gets started, you have a very tough time trying to treat it. Sex should never be a play toy, and people who carry HSV-4 should make sure to work hard to make sure their partner doesn’t infect them with an STI like HSV-4.

The Cervareline-19 vaccine is proposed for children and teenagers at high risk for contracting genital herpes, which are 13-18 years old, regardless of sexual orientation.

How is this vaccine different from other vaccines?

Vaccines are supposed to be easy to use, so most common vaccines don’t require the injection of needles or any form of drawing. They are made through the use of cow’s milk, and those who accept the vaccination do not have to have any of their liver functioning through immunization in order to receive the vaccine. The only function of the immune system that is put at risk through this vaccine is the thyroid gland. In this immunization, you will be injecting a dose of the vaccine into the thyroid gland in order to create antibodies that will be used to fight herpes, also known as herpes simplex virus 1 or HSV-1. There are currently no other vaccine to provide strong protection against herpes simplex virus 1 and HSV-1. The two earlier versions of these types of vaccines, VSV-5940 and IL-2V-3G, worked very well at preventing infection when used as directed. This new vaccine provides an easier, faster and more efficient method of providing protection against HSV-1 and HSV-2, but does not prevent infections occurring from herpes simplex virus 1.

What are the risks of herpes immunization?

Compared to other types of vaccines like diphtheria, whooping cough, tetanus, and polio, the most common risks of the Cervareline-19 vaccine are side effects from injection, the risk of kidney, brain and thyroid damage or death from either HSV-1 or HSV-2 infection, and the risk of birth defects from recombinant DNA. These are very rare risks for this type of vaccine, and should be considered when making a decision about a vaccine.

How can you tell if you are at risk for herpes?

Yup. Contact your healthcare provider or local STD/HIV clinic to make sure you are up to date on HV/STI vaccinations and getting tested on a regular basis.

For more information about herpes, visit the National Coalition of STD Directors and the CDC. Also, visit a local clinic that is approved by the CDC to be able to discuss prevention and care options that are currently being offered.

Leave a Comment